Legendary Collection Kaiba – A Boon for Goat Format Players

Legendary Collection Kaiba hit stores on March 9th, 2018, and it’s chock-full of cards for Goat Format players. Really, it’s full of cards for players of any format, but this is a series about Goat Format, so we’ll focus on those. In this article, we’ll talk about what Goat reprints you can look forward to, why LCK is an important reprint set for IRL Goat Format players, and how this set might impact Goat Format card values.

Legendary Collection Kaiba – An Overview

The new Legendary Collection comes with 110 cards, all foil – 49 Secret Rares and 61 Ultra Rares.

It includes cards used by show characters Seto Kaiba, Chazz Princeton, Kaibaman, Yugi, Pegasus, Yuma, Yusei, Jack Atlas, Luna, and more. It includes support for archetypes such as Blue Eyes, Dragunity, Utopia, Vampire, and more.

It’s a pretty important set for anyone playing anything even closely related to those archetypes.

It includes a good mix of cards from across the various incarnations of Yu-Gi-Oh!, from the original series through today.

You see old cards such as Blue-Eyes White Dragon, La Jinn the Mystical Genie of the Lamp, and Vampire Lord alongside new cards such as Ash Blossom & Joyous Spring and Ghost Reaper & Winter Cherries.

Looking at the card list, it’s clear that this reprint set is one of the best in quite some time.

Goat Format Reprints

There are an absolute ton of Goat Format reprints. Listing them all would be pretty time consuming, so I’m just going to cover the more important ones here.

Chain Disappearance

Though Chain Disappearance isn’t a card that sees much play in Goat Format, it’s a quirky tech card nonetheless. And until now, the only foil version was the PGL2 print, which was in gold rare. Not all players like gold rare prints, so having a secret rare print of Chain Disappearance is always nice.

I don’t expect Chain Disappearance’s price to rise or fall with this reprint, mostly because it sees almost no play in modern Goat Format. That being said, a secret rare version is always a nice thing to have, considering the original print is a silver rare.

Delinquent Duo

This is easily the most sought-after reprint in the set. Delinquent Duo has always been the most expensive Goat Format card – since I started playing back in 2015, it’s never been less than $10. Now, $10 for a card is solid, but Duo’s price has fluctuated wildly over the past two years.

This isn’t surprising; prior to the Legendary Collection Kaiba reprint, it only had a few prints. You had the original Magic Ruler print, then the Dark Beginnings 1 reprint, and then the Spell Ruler updated reprint. That’s about it. The cheapest had been the MRL print, the original one, which is still sitting around $10 for non-1st edition versions.

The LCK reprint is just $3 right now, which makes getting a physical copy of Duo a lot easier. This should help a lot of players replace proxied versions of Duo with a legit one, which is always great. It’s a boon for collectors too – the reprint likely won’t drive the price of existing versions down, as Goat Format cards tend to retain their value through reprints.


De-Fusion is a card that doesn’t see much play in Goat Format. This is likely because the Fusion monsters that it can counter are already countered by more versatile cards. De-Fusion has seen play in modern formats, but more as a nice card than anything else. Right now the Legendary Collection secret rare version of De-Fusion is selling for less than $1.

Its reprint in secret rare, though, bumps its highest rarity from super rare, which isn’t a bad thing for your binder. But most collectors would prefer the super rare print mostly because it’s the original print of the card.

Enemy Controller

Enemy Controller sees niche play, usually in the side deck or as a one-of in the main deck. A lot of people try to stay away from Enemy Controller mostly because it doesn’t really do a whole lot. However, the secret rare print is a good middle ground between the more expensive super and ultra versions ($4 and $6 at the time of this writing) and the many common, Battle Pack, and gold rare versions.

If you’re playing Enemy Controller and you’re looking to pick up a play set that isn’t gold rare, this is a great reprint. However, the card’s popularity isn’t all that high.

I think that the reason the original print ultra rare is the highest-priced is for collection purposes more than anything else. But a secret rare print will likely make its way into players’ decks over time.

Interdimensional Matter Transporter

Interdimensional Matter Transporter doesn’t see a lot of play. That being said, it’s nice to have a secret rare version of the card, especially considering that the only alternatives are the original print ultra rare, the Dark Beginnings ultra rare, or commons. Nobody really plays it, but it’s nice to have a higher-rarity reprint that’s actually cheaper than the original print.


Polymerization has only had common or super rare prints, so a secret rare reprint is pretty nice for collectors. It is one of those original series cards that has struck a chord with many a duelist over the years, and collectors love them. But with so many common prints, and the super rare prints often being a couple of bucks, finding a nice copy (or three) has been tricky.

Polymerization has a ton of reprints, but this is the first secret rare print of a card that came out with the first-ever booster set. It won’t be expensive; none of the copies really are. But the secret rare print is a nice middle ground for many players.


Terraforming is one of the highest-priced reprints in Legendary Collection Kaiba. This is probably because it’s still relevant after 14 years – it was first printed as a common in Pharaonic Guardian. It has, as of this writing, just three foil prints – the Legendary Collection secret rare, the Astral Pack 1 super rare, and the OTS 5 ultimate rare. $10, $10, and $40, respectively.

Terraforming sees a lot of play in the modern game, which explains its price. It has a dozen reprints (don’t take that number literally). But only three are foil – the rest are common. And players love having shiny versions of cards. It also sees play in Goat Format, specifically with Gravekeeper’s. So it’s not surprising that the new print has already shot up in price due to high demand.

And chances are that Terraforming’s price will remain high unless it gets restricted to one or outright banned. I don’t see that happening. So if you’re able, get your hands on a set quick because it’s likely they’ll increase in price in the short term.

Thunder Dragon

This was a long-awaited reprint for Goat Format players. Thunder Dragon has only ever seen common printings before being released as an ultra rare in Legendary Collection Kaiba. And considering the fact that Chaos decks are becoming more prominent, especially in the DuelistGroundz metagame, having a shiny Thunder Dragon reprint is a big boon for players who prefer foil.

Also, this reprint should help Thunder Dragon’s prices a bit. Though it was only ever a common, it was in relatively short supply. As a three-of in any deck that plays it, and given its short print status, getting hands on a playset could get somewhat expensive. Now, duelists should have the ability to get a foil playset for about the same price.

Other Reprints

Cards such as Mirror Force, Ring of Destruction, Vampire Lord, Vorse Raider, X-Head Cannon, Y-Dragon Head, Z-Metal Tank, and XYZ-Dragon Cannon also saw reprints. Other reprints include The Flute of Summoning Dragon, White Hole, Anti-Raigeki, and, of course, modern cards that aren’t legal for play in Goat Format.

The major reprints for modern players include the major handtraps like Ash Blossom & Joyous Spring, Ghost Reaper & Winter Cherries, and Ghost Ogre & Snow Rabbit. Raigeki also got a reprint, which is great, though it’s still close to $20 as of this writing.


This reprint set was one of the better ones in recent memory. In addition to some awesome Goat Format reprints, we saw a lot of modern reprints that should make the game more accessible for budget players. This collection will likely go down as one of the weaker ones for Goat Format players, as only really Duo was needed. If we had a Metamorphosis reprint in secret rare it’d likely be even more important. The Terraforming print was nice, though.

Overall, if you’re a player of the game, it’s worth it to either get some packs or buy the singles. This is especially true for Goat Format players.

That’s it for this time. As always, you can email me with questions, comments and more at [email protected] Make sure to keep checking back each week for about Goat Format right here on YGOPRODeck.com!


Writer for YGOPRODeck and POJO which mainly focus on the GOAT format.


Writer for YGOPRODeck and POJO which mainly focus on the GOAT format.

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